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Revista Maxim marzo 2016 USA PDF

Revista Maxim marzo 2016 USA

Descargar Revista Maxim marzo 2016 USA PDF


MAXIM
SARDAR BIGLARI
Editor in Chief
special creative adviser
editor at large
art & design director
features director
managing editor
director of photography
director of production & manufacturing
features editor
assistant editor
automotive editor
contributing style editor
deputy art director
senior designer
research chief
copy chief
production associate
GILLES BENSIMON
GLENN O’BRIEN
GUILLAUME BRUNEAU
JACQUELINE MIRÖ
LUCY SILBERMAN
JESSICA ATHANASIOU PIORK
GUSTAVO GONZALEZ
MEG O’ROURKE
KEVIN PIRES
DAN CARNEY
ANDREW PORTER
PAUL O’DEA
ALEXANDRA MAISCH
CHRISTIAN SMITH
STEPHANIE MAKRIAS
APRIL MOKWA
MAXIM.COM
executive director, digital
digital deputy editor
digital features editor
senior editor
senior editor
associate editor
social media manager
digital photo editor
AARON GELL
JARED KELLER
CHRIS WILSON
ALI DRUCKER
GABRIELLA PAIELLA
SEAN ABRAMS
CARA HESSELS
KARIS DOERNER
WEST COAST
West Coast editor
West Coast contributing editor
assistant editor
RUTH HILTON
ELIZABETH RILEY
JULIAN STERN
publisher
general manager, digital
associate publisher
associate publisher, marketing
ad director
business director
account director
account director
account manager
account manager
digital innovation director
digital account manager
marketing manager
marketing creative director
executive director, communications
Midwest director
Detroit director
Southern director
European representative
European representative
marketing & sales associate
chief operating officer
finance director
genera/ counsel
senior paralegal
director of1T
senior manager, licensing &
international publishing
manager, licensing &
international publishing
KEVIN MARTINEZ
DAN SHAR
BETH PRESS
ESTHER RAPHAEL
EVAN BRUNO
KELSEY ARMSTRONG
VANESSA VERDINO
DIANE CROOK
LAUREN CERAVOLO
MICHAEL VIVALO
JESSI CASTRO
EMILY MEJER
TIM O’KEEFE
RAY RUALO
LISA MARIE COSTA
MARISA WARREN
BRIAN GREEN
JIM YOUNG
FABRIZIO LOLLI
PIERFRANCESCO CARIA
CHRISTINA BIONDI
ROBERT PRICE
JONATHAN J. BIGHAM
IAN WARREN
CATHERINE BAXTER
DANIEL BRUNDIGE
STEPHANIE MARINO
DANA LOMBARDI
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ILLUSTRATORS
Jean Philippe De/homme, Sante D’Orazio, Todd Eber/e, Tiziano Magni, Wayne Maser, Philippe Petit Roulet, Bill Phelps, Mark Platt, Chris Stein
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Lukas I. Alpert, Andrea Bennett, Debbie Harry, Michael Kaplan, Ilooman Majd, Ben Mezrich,
T. Cole Rachel, Dave Reeves, .Jack Sheehan, Barbara Sicuranza, Chris Stein
CONTRIBUTING DIGITAL EDITORS
Steve Huff Adam K. Raymond, Mikel/e Street (style)
SPECIAL THANKS
Lisa Benson, Yaniv Evan, Alex Gobo, Betina Goldstein, Grace Hwang, Chandra Knee, Sean Lamm, George Maier, Paulina Olivares,
Diane Prete, Danielle Quebrado, Shiara Robinson, Taylor Shields, Dean Snyder, Michael Weaver
MAXIM
A BIGLARI HOLDINGS COMPANY MAXIM
TABLI
CONTENTS
-Q
14
FAST FRIENDS
Yaniv Evan of Powerplant
Motorcycles revs up.
FEBRUARY 2016 MAXIM.COM
UP FRONT
08
ASK MAXIMUS
Our Dictator of Decorum
answers your questions.
PACK MENTALITY
Do you squeeze shoes, socks,
and six shirts into the last
sliver of space in your suitcase?
26
THE GREGORY BROTHERS
Becoming famous on YouTube
before it was a full-time job.
32
SCENTS OF SECURITY
Never think twice
before spraying.
34
GENTLEMAN’S SPY
CLOSET
Everything you need for stealth.
FEATURES
42
MR. PECK
Gregory Peck’s grandson
Ethan Peck unbuttoned.
50
WHAT LEADING MEN WEAR
Massimiliano Giornetti,
Ferragamo’s creative director, on
helming the iconic Italian brand.
On the cover: Elsa Hosk shot on
location at Caesars Palace Las
Vegas inside the Titus Villa,
available to book online at
anthologysuites.com, and the
Garden Qfthe Gods Pool Oasis at
Caesars Palace Las Vegas.
54
VEGAS BABY
Elsa Hosk is an absolute Angel.
Pro Qfprovided.
THE MEN WHO MADE VEGAS
A guide to the guys who shaped
America’s most expensive
playground.
PLAY TO WYNN
Steve WS’nn knows all.
THE MATHEMATICIAN
WHO BEAT THE DEALER
How Ed Thorp mastered winning.
TWENTY-ONE
The incredible story that
inspired thefilm 21.
FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY
Floyd Mayweather worked
hard for his crown.
ALESSO
A conversation with the man
who makes crowds move.
EXPECT EPIC
Where to eat, sleep, shop, play,
and party in Vegas.
74
LAS VEGAS
Photographer Todd Eberle turns
his lens on Sin City.
82
NORTHERN LIGHTS
100 Danish women hot enough to
melt even the most stubborn snow.
88
MAIL-ORDER MERCENARIES
The story of Soldier
of Fortune and its leader,
Lt. Col. Robert Brown.
4 TRAVEL
“Whatever anyone tells you, you will never,
ever pack your bags perfectly. You will either
overpack or underpack; you will always
regret not bringing that one sweater or shirt or
extra pair of shoes, and you will certainly be
dismayed at your choice of neckties and socks.”
The salesman assured me that the firm had made exactly the same case
for Hemingway, who always traveled with his books. I wanted to remind
him that the age of steamship travel was over and although we were not yet
in the age of tablets, we were already in the age of undignified jet travel,
too short journeys to too faraway places, travel with little time and very
little space for leisure reading. So even though I couldn’t afford a Goyard
trunk made for me, in the size I preferred, with my initials hand painted on
the side, I had other excuses to fall back on.
Sadly, travel isn’t what it used to be (and neither is reading, or books).
Happily, though, ordinary folk can afford travel these days. In Europe,
EasyJet can take you from London to Kraköw for less than the cost of
lunch for two. But travel means luggage, no matter the length of the trip or
the class of service. And luggage rarely flies free anymore. Packing your
luggage, then, is a bit of an art.
Whatever anyone tells you, you will never, ever pack your bags perfect
ly. You will either overpack or underpack; you will always regret not bringing
that one sweater or shirt or extra pair of shoes, and you will certainly be dis
mayed at your choice of neckties and socks. The carry on you decided would
be the perfect size shrinks radically when faced with a few extra hours in duty
free, where everything starts to look like a deal, at least in a foreign currency.
I used to travel with bridle leather suitcases. Until one airline, despite
the “first class” tag prominently attached (I wasn’t paying), put a deep gash in
one of them that extended the length of the lid. (The suitcases did come with
heavy canvas protector sleeves, but I refused to use them since they seemed
to defeat the whole point of having beautiful leather bags.) While I didn’t
mind my suitcases being well aged, I didn’t want them completely de
stroyed, which is what I imagined would happen with a few more flights. I
fell back to using my Globe Trotter a pressed fiberboard suitcase I’ve
owned since boarding school. These have become as expensive, for some
strange reason, as bridle leather ones and mine, nowin its third decade of
use, is only slightly worse for wear despite having circled the globe numerous
times. The thing about Globe Trotters and bridle leather cases is that, un
like today’s suitcases with retractable handles and wheels, they are essen
tially empty boxes, easy to organize, with straps to hold your goods in place.
They don’t contain awkward ridges where the handle stores deep in the body
of the case, so you have a nice big drawer for your shirts, underwear, and
socks when you set the suitcase down on the luggage rack in a hotel.
Despite my fondness for the old school suitcase and my general antipa
thy toward that modern invention the wheel, I finally had to admit that
wheeled luggage makes sense today, especially the four wheeled kind that
somehow seems a more stylish presentation than the one you drag behind
you. You gently nudge it along, and sometimes you can even let go of it as it
glides through the airport. The all aluminum kind is ideal these are not
only the best looking by far, but the dents and scratches they collect add a
sort of machine age retro character that plastic cannot duplicate. They are
usually out of the price range of most of us, but they have a long life. Com
posite materials are nearly as good. I prefer dark, solid colors, with no visi
ble branding. Just do your own Goyard thing and “paint” (I use a broad
Sharpie in silver, gold, or white) your initials on the top, side, and back so
that however the case tumbles down the chute, it is unmistakably yours. I
still use the Globe Trotter, but only when I want to feel important, which is
less often than I’d like. (If I’m ever invited onto Air Force One, even on
John Kerry’s 757, I’ll be sure to use that, or maybe the bridle leather.)
The limited selection of cargo a stylish suitcase accommodates, and
what one wears while wheeling it, are, ofcourse, as important as the luggage.
However long the trip is, I rarely bring more clothes than a week without
laundry services would require. I know that most think laundry prices in
hotels are outrageous and they are but at least you’re not paying a fortune
for hotel phone calls anymore, and it’s probably a business expense; go ahead
and splurge. Your clothes will usually come back to your room looking better
than ever. (Or you can always run to the nearest H&M and buy new clothes
for as much as the laundry service will cost. Another rule of packing: Make
sure there is enough room in your luggage for a few purchases.)
Packing a week’s worth of clothes simplifies matters: You need seven of
everything except sweaters (in the cold season) or suits, jackets, trousers,
or jeans. Ideally, you will have worn your jeans en route, as well as a sport
coat that eliminates two items. Depending on where you’re going, what
you’re going for, and who you are, you may need a suit, but never more than
two, if one is solid gray and the other solid navy. You also never need more
than two pairs of shoes: one pair in the suitcase and the other, preferably a
slip on, to wear while traveling as well as in more casual settings. If you
don’t wear suits, or won’t need to more than once or twice during the trip,
you can substitute casual pants (such as khakis), and perhaps a casual jack
et, for one or both of the suits.
No matter your suitcase leather, fiberboard, composite, or soft
sided always pack as many socks in your shoes as possible, and the shoes
in shoe bags so they don’t soil your clothes or your luggage. Not every
town is fastidious about enforcing dog poop scooping laws. Shirts should
be folded try having your local cleaner return them to you folded before
you go on a trip and pants just need to be folded in half. “lilrning a suit
jacket inside out before folding helps reduce creases, but I don’t stress the
creasing a hot shower with the bathroom door closed and the suit hang
ing on the towel rack usually eliminates most creases, unless your clothes
are made of 100 percent polyester, of course. In which case, you have more
important things to worry about than just creases.
I have two or three Dopp kits I’ve used over the years I like my bridle
leather one, except it’s like the luggage: one big empty space. I find I use a
canvas kit that has a few pockets inside to help organize things like nail
clippers, sewing kit, etc., which tend to get frustratingly lost in the leather
one. But I like my kit to be as beautiful as my luggage it is, after all, what
I look at every morning and evening on a trip. It’s also what the hotel maid
looks at every day, and you don’t want her to think you have no taste, right?
Finally, your carry on bag or briefcase should be stylish, leather or can
vas, and wheel free. What kind of man (or woman can’t carry a small bag?
Are we that lazy? The bag should hold your computer, iPad or Kindle, plus
a magazine or two, and have enough room for airport purchases and even
extra emergency storage, in case you bought one too many items on your
trip that will absolutely not fit in your suitcase. It’s all pretty simple, this
travel preparation, but not scientific. You will still have regrets. The art is
in minimizing them.
12
FEBRUARY 2016 MAXIM.COM Ask
Badges? We don’t need no stinking badges!
Yeah, we follow the rules, but we make the rules
up as we go along. We rule the rules.
A lot of guys think there is a sort of Ten
Commandments of how to dress and behave.
And there was, sort of, until somebody smashed
them to bits like Moses did with the tablets of the
law. Maybe the Men Commandments were
smæshed by Elvis. Others might say Oscar Wilde,
Frank Sinatra, James Dean, Mick Jagger. But the
point is that the laws of dress and behavior are
evolutionary. We have to adapt or reinvent them
now and then according to prevailing conditions.
It used to be said that gentlemen did not wear
white until after Easter and then not after Labor
Day. But after canoeing across Greenland and
playing golfin Staten Island on Christmas, I came
to recognize climate change, and declared that
white can now be worn from the beginning of
spring training until the World Series. After that
we can wear “winter white,” which allows white
sneakers, white parkas, toggle coats, and anything
pmssing for alpine camouflage. Now more than
ever, we must be adaptable.
Things change fast. If you have any ques
tions, ask me. I might be wrong, but I’ll definite
ly have an opinion. And hey, you, Thou Shalt
Not Flip the Collar of Thine Polo!
When did it become commonplace for powerful
men like the president to stop wearing pocket
squares?
The first “atomic age” president, Harry Truman, a
natty onetime haberdasher, wore the “TV fold,” a
slim rectangle of white linen showing above the
breast pocket. Dwight Eisenhower was a sartori
al innovator as a general, inventing the Eisenhow
er Army jacket that resembled the motorcycle
jacket Brando wore and the jean jacket worn by
James Dean. Eisenhower went hankie free as a
civilian. Handsome lady killer JFK wore a little
flush of hankie under his lapel, while his successor,
LBJ, favored a multi peaked sailboat regatta of
linen triangles. Dick Nixon ditched the pocket
linen too bad; he could have used it for a good
wipe when he got the fatal sweats during his “IV
debates with Kennedy or for polishing his bowl
ing ball. He probably thought the hankie was
fussy. Gerald Ford was also a square but never
had one in his pocket. No nonsense Jimmy Cart
er also went plain not that he wasn’t concerned
with his appearance. He actually changed the
part in his hair from right to leftwhile in office and
added some Just for Men tint, too. Dutch Rea
gan, Hollywood’s president, wore a pocket square
the size of a dinner napkin when he was just a
movie star, but as commander in chief he had an
exec look with French cuffs and a white linen peak
in his pocket. Ever since, the hankie Iras deserted
the White House. President Clinton, a.k.a. Bub
ba, went without pocket decor, even when blow
ing a sax in shades. Bush Il, a.k.a. Dubya, was ms
plain a dresser as he was a plain speaker. Presi
dent Obama, a svelte minimalist, also keeps his
pocket unloaded. Whatg next? A Chanel scalf?
Maybe. Only one of the Republican wannabes,
Dr. Carson, has sported a pocket swatch. Where
have all the hankies gone? Perhaps it was the rise
of that new compulsory accessory, the flag lapel
pin that is universally worn by politicos and
CEOs alike. The pocket squares distract from
that patriotic pin! Why no one lus introduced a
Stars and Stripes hankie, an even more flagrant
display of homeland fervor, escapes me.
Is art dead? What’s the pulse of contemporary
American culture?
It kind of hurts to say this, but fashion is catching
up to alt as a cultural force. Why? Because the hog
wild speculation in art cranked out, celebrified,
institutionally promoted art, put in storage to
await auction has skewed the whole racket. Fmsh
ion, at its best, is creative, democratic, personal,
and life changing, and everyone can afford some.
What should you wear to an art gallery opening?
Art should be about essence: Who is the artist,
and what does the art say and do? So the best
way to dress is by looking like yourself, in full, in
depth. Hopefully it doesn’t involve a clown cos
tume, a conceptual Halloween outfit, or some
form of “Hey, over here!” grandstanding.
How do you feel about dressing up leatherjack-
ets? A Perfecto, in particular.
It’s the only male item of apparel suitable for
brooches. In my youth it w•cus nicely executed pins
like BRITS OUT OF IRELAND, maybe a discreet
Chairman Mao pin, a peace symbol, or a Tao pin.
My song Perfecto sports some political pins with
initials that I’d rather not know the meaning of.
Please comment on this whole sweatpants
thing.
I have some nice ones. I wear them to, at, and from
the gym, along with some suitable disguise. I do
like my new ones, which have zippers at the ankle
and fit well. I am open to possible use on sh01t
economy airline runs requiring physique challeng
ing flexibility, and also, ofcourse, with dark glmsses
and a suitable disguise. I wore some ofthose black
ones with stripes for Halloween a couple years
back. I was going •as a sucker emcee on social secu
rity. I recently read that some swank authority is
sued rules for wearing sweatpants, but at this
point my only rule is “Thou shalt sweat.”
In this age of tailored shirts, can you wear a
vest if you aren’t a bartender and it is not part of
a uniform?
Have a couple three piece suits for winter wear.
The suit with vest was invented in an era with
out central heating, but the vest also gives the
office dweller a bit more control over his cubicle
temperature, and it looks trimmer than sitting
there in your shirtsleeves. Plus, it gives you more
pocket capacity enough to tote a pack of Cam
els, a small iPod, a pillbox, pepper spray, Band
Aids, a magnifring glass, a pitch pipe, a guitar
pick, hair elastics…all that miscellanea that
seems to have no place of its own.
What is an appropriate outfit for a grad-school
student? One that is far from slovenly without
being overly formal?
I don’t think of “grad student” as something you
dress for. There is a kind of grad school look that
after some wear and tear turns into professorial.
Corduroy suits, tweed jackets with leather elbow
patches, pocket protectors, blue oxford cloth
button downs, shell cordovan oxfords, slightly
too wide rep ties, warm looking socks, old Jack
Purcells. The best you can hope for is somewhat
enhanced cred leading to a sort of cafeteria tenure.
What is your take on the full Windsor knot?
I like to call it the full Saxe Coburg knot, in mem
ory of the original name of the clan now known as
the House of Windsor, the Brits’ German over
lords. I tend to agree with Ian Fleming, who in
.Fmm Rikt’ia with Love called the knot “the mark of a
cad.” Its big and showy, and its symmetry gives it a
sort of anal retentive, control freak air. It was the
preferred knot of The Odd CoupFs Felix Unger. I
prefer the casual, asymmetrical four in hand knot,
which I sometimes refer to as the Half Klugman
because it’s the best knot when you intend to wear
your tie at halfmast with an open collar.
Column by GLENN O’BRIEN Illustrations by JEAN-PHILIPPE DELHOMME
8
FEBRUARY 2016
Send questionsfor Maximus to gobrien@maxim.com.
Follow Glenn O’Brien on Twitter @lordrochester.
MAXIM.COM

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